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Learn Why Road Rage is Causing More Fatal Accidents Than Ever Before
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Learn Why Road Rage is Causing More Fatal Accidents Than Ever Before

Learn Why Road Rage is Causing More Fatal Accidents Than Ever Before


Learn Why Road Rage is Causing More Fatal Accidents Than Ever Before

Many people will experience road rage at one time or another, and it is generally nothing serious. It might involve being upset that someone cut you off, or angry that someone cut ahead at a four-way stop. Whatever the case, being mad is not generally dangerous to others around you – unless you experience full-on road rage.

Keep reading to find out what we mean by this and why it is causing so many fatal car accidents. Then contact Law Offices of Patrick S. Aguirre at 800-572-1252 if you have been injured in a car accident and require help from an experienced attorney.

You Might Be Surprised by these Road Rage Statistics

The National Highway Traffic Administration (NHTSA) released some information that is truly frightening. They found that two out of every three fatal traffic deaths involved aggressive driving, and more than one in three of those involved a firearm. 2% of drivers admitted that they had tried to run another car off the road. Imagine that if you are on a busy highway and there are 100 vehicles, statistically speaking, two of them would have drivers who had tried to run another vehicle off the road at some point.

There are Many Causes of Road Rage

If you ask a person experiencing road rage, they are likely to tell you that they are angry because of what other drivers are doing. We know this is not true because while that “annoying” driver is bothering them, there are likely many other vehicles nearby driven, by people who are not angry at the “annoying” driver. So what does cause road rage?

According to doctors, it is caused by a condition called “intermittent explosive disorder.” This is the medical way of describing a person who gets very angry, very fast, and loses total control of their emotions. Others might refer to it as “anger management issues.”

Your Job is to Not Contribute to the Problem

You cannot control the actions of other people, but you can control your own. If you see yourself in the above description, then you might need professional help. By managing stress, talking to a professional, and learning how to de-escalate, you can stay safer from your own road rage. For example, if you are stuck in traffic and are going to be late, instead of getting mad, call whomever you are meeting to tell them that you will be late.

If you do not see yourself in the description, that does not mean that you don’t have anything to do. You can make sure that you do not react to people experiencing road rage. They might seem silly and it might seem to be “fun” to hit the brakes to make a tailgater slam on their brakes, or a similar reaction, but this only makes them angrier – and increases your danger.

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